Bom Burgers เบอร์เกอร์หมู หรือ เบอร์เกอร์ไก่ จากน้องป้อม (Asian-style pork burger or chicken burger)

I learn to make this one from a Thai in Thailand many years ago. This burger recipe is the result of my Scottish mate Alan’s wife, Bom, trying to make a “burger” for her Western husband. It doesn’t taste western at all 🙂 but it’s awesome. She called it “A-hahn farang” (อาหารฝรั่ง or “white people food”) but I call bullshit–this is Thai food! I did have her teach me how to make them and now I’ve made them on three continents–New Zealand counts as another continent, right?

  • 1 pound of lean pork (not tenderloin) or chicken breast
  • 1 tablespoon Golden Mountain Seasoning Sauce (or Maggie)
  • 2 teaspoons fish sauce
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon coriander powder (optional)
  • cornstarch (optional)
  • oil for frying
  • chopped onion
  • bread–can be white bread, a hamburger bun or sandwich thins. Wheat and multi-grain breads with nuts and twigs does not work as well.

You could buy ground pork or chicken, but you really want a very lean mince and optimally a finer grind that what I see in the stores in the USA. If you have a food processor this task is very easy. If you have a cutting board and a good knife you can make do but it will take some time. So try to get your meat ground finer than what you see at a store but not all the way down to a complete paste. These quantities make 4 burgers.

Mix in Golden Mountain, fish sauce, sugar, pepper, and coriander into the meat. Let rest for 10 minutes.

There are two options for the next step. Option one is use a steamer to cook them. Option two is a pan with an inch or so of water in it. I have a steamer but never use it for this. I just do the pan option. I get the water rapidly boiling, then form about a quarter pound burger as thin as I can make it (a good inch larger in diameter than a hamburger bun because the meat is going to contract while boiling/steaming). Then drop them into the water. It takes about 10 minutes to fully cook. I flip at least once during that time. You really ought to save the water once you’ve cooked the burgers. It’s a nice start towards a soup.

Remove from the water onto paper towels. Let cool and pat dry. Put a very light dusting of cornstarch on both side of the patty. Shake all the cornstarch that you can off it. Next you can deep fry or fry in an inch of oil in your pan. Get your oil good and hot before frying. Remember, the burger is cooked, you are just adding crunch. 350 degrees Fahrenheit, 180 degrees Celsius is about right. Fry them until nice and brown–should only take a few minutes. Remove to draining rack or paper towels.

To assemble, take two slice of white bread (or hamburger bun–but plain white bread is the “classic”) put American (Kraft/Best Foods/Hellmans/Duke’s) or Japanese (Kewpie) style mayonnaise on both slices of bread. Sprinkle raw, chopped onion on one side. Top that with your patty then the other slice of bread and Bob’s your uncle. Make 4 burgers.

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About Joe Graff

President and co-owner of DC based design studio, icon werx, inc. Lived in Thailand for 8+ years (2003-2011). Rheumatoid arthritis and triple joint replacement patient.
This entry was posted in Chicken, Main Dish, Pork, Thai and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Bom Burgers เบอร์เกอร์หมู หรือ เบอร์เกอร์ไก่ จากน้องป้อม (Asian-style pork burger or chicken burger)

  1. I think the seasoning sound interesting. I like that they were created as “white peoples’ food.” My mom is Chinese so we always poke fun at white people – like my dad. Nice to see your post!

    • that would be sounds – would hate to check the spelling before I hit the post comment button

    • Joe Graff says:

      This word, ฝรั่ง or farang, often gets translated as “caucasian” or “foreigner”, but that is not really accurate. “Farang” is slightly pejorative–not quite a racial slur, but trending that way. Though use is ubiquitous, most don’t mean in a bad way. So “white-boy food” was my effort at an actual translation of the sentiment of the statement. 🙂 (I do speak, read and write Thai จริงด้วย! )

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